Evolving the Agile Framework:

Update to SAFe 5

Read the latest articles

Learn more

A Scaled Agile Bronze Partner

Agileseventeen LLC

Save 30% On AG17 Courses Use Code BAN003

ORDER NOW

Upcoming SAFe trainings Leading SAFe 5.1

Learn More

Upcoming SAFe trainings SAFe PO/PM

Enroll Now

Upcoming SAFe trainings SAFe Practitioner

Enroll Now

SCRUM Videos

How to use SBOK Guide

The SBOK™ Guide was developed as a means to create a necessary guide for organizations and project management practitioners who want to implement Scrum, as well as those already doing so who want to make needed improvements to their processes. It is based on experience drawn from thousands of projects across a variety of organizations and industries. The contributions of many Scrum experts and project management practitioners have been considered in its development.

Why get certified in SCRUM

Scrum is one of the most popular Agile methodologies. It is an adaptive, iterative, fast, flexible, and effective methodology designed to deliver significant value quickly and throughout a project. Scrum ensures transparency in communication and creates an environment of collective accountability and continuous progress. A key strength of Scrum lies in its use of cross-functional, self-organized, and empowered teams who divide their work into short, concentrated work cycles called Sprints.

Scrum Principles

Scrum principles are the core guidelines for applying the Scrum framework and should mandatorily be used in all Scrum projects. They are non-negotiable and must be applied as specified in the SBOK™. Keeping the principles intact and using them appropriately instils confidence in the Scrum framework with regard to attaining the objectives of the project.

Scrum Vs Traditional PM

Traditional project management emphasizes on conducting detailed upfront planning for the project with emphasis on fixing the scope, cost and schedule – and managing those parameters. Whereas, Scrum encourages data-based, iterative decision making in which the primary focus is on delivering products that satisfy customer requirements.

To deliver the greatest amount of value in the shortest amount of time, Scrum promotes prioritization and Time-boxing over fixing the scope, cost and schedule of a project. An important feature of Scrum is self-organization, which allows the individuals who are actually doing the work to estimate and take ownership of tasks.

Following table summarizes many of the differences between Scrum and traditional project management:

Parameters Scrum Traditional Project Management
Emphasis is on People Processes
Documentation Minimal – only as required Comprehensive
Process style Iterative Linear
Upfront planning Low High
Prioritization of Requirements Based on business value and regularly updated Fixed in the Project Plan
Quality assurance Customer centric Process centric
Organization Self-organized Managed
Management style Decentralized Centralized
Change Updates to Productized Product Backlog Formal Change Management System
Leadership Collaborative, Servant Leadership Command and control
Performance measurement Business value Plan conformity
Return on Investment Early/throughout project life End of project life
Customer involvement High throughout the project Varies depending on the project lifecycle

Why SCRUM?

Scrum is one of the most popular agile methodologies. It is an adaptive, iterative, fast, flexible, and effective methodology designed to deliver significant value quickly and throughout a project. Scrum ensures transparency in communication and creates an environment of collective accountability and continuous progress. The Scrum framework, as defined in the SBOK™ Guide, is structured in such a way that it supports product and service development in all types of industries and in any type of project, irrespective of its complexity.

A key strength of Scrum lies in its use of cross-functional, self-organized, and empowered teams who divide their work into short, concentrated work cycles called Sprints.

Traditional project management emphasizes on conducting detailed upfront planning for the project with emphasis on fixing the scope, cost and schedule – and managing those parameters. Whereas, Scrum encourages data-based, iterative decision making in which the primary focus is on delivering products that satisfy customer requirements.

To deliver the greatest amount of value in the shortest amount of time, Scrum promotes prioritization and Time-boxing over fixing the scope, cost and schedule of a project. An important feature of Scrum is self-organization, which allows the individuals who are actually doing the work to estimate and take ownership of tasks.